International Conference of Recent Trends in
Environmental Science and Engineering
(RTESE'17)


AUGUST 23 - 25, 2017 | TORONTO, CANADA

Program

The Conference will be held at Ryerson University in the The George Vari Engineering and Computing Centre. Please click here for map of the location.



Wednesday
August 23


3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Registrations
Registrations will be taking place in the hall next to room ENG-LG-015.

Thursday
August 24


8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Registrations
Room: ENG-LG-021
9:00 AM - 9:15 AM

Official Opening
Dr. Mehrab Mehrvar, Ryerson University, Canada

9:15 AM - 10:00 AM
Keynote Lecture

Silent Spring revisited: Trends in Environmental Engineering and Sciences, from the 1960s to Today
Dr. Lynda H. McCarthy, Ryerson University, Canada

10:00 AM - 10:45 AM
Keynote Lecture

Catalytic Strategies for the Production of Renewable Fuels and Chemicals
Dr. Y-H. Chin, University of Toronto, Canada

10:45 AM - 11:15 AM
Coffee Break
10:45 AM - 11:15 AM
Session

Poster Session

11:15 AM - 11:55 PM
Session

Greenhouse Effect and Environmental Sustainability

11:55 PM - 12:00 PM
Group Photo
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Lunch
1:00 AM - 1:45 AM
Keynote Lecture

Innovation in a Regulated Environment: Why Do We Need it and How Are We Going to Get It?
Tom Kaszas, Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change, Canada

1:45 PM - 2:05 PM
Coffee Break
2:05 PM - 4:05 PM
Workshop

Combined Photochemical and Biological Processes for Water and Wastewater Treatment: An Overview of Trends, Advances, and Future
Dr. Mehrab Mehrvar, Ryerson University, Canada

Keynote Lecture

9:15 AM - 10:00 AM | Session Chair: Dr. Mehrab Mehrvar, Ryerson University, Canada

Silent Spring Revisited: Trends in Environmental Engineering and Sciences, from the 1960s to Today
Dr. Lynda H. McCarthy, Ryerson University, Canada


Abstract
While Silent Spring was responsible for bringing the massive environmental issues of the post-war world to the attention of the voting public, scientists and engineers had been concerned for decades about pollution from radioactive fall-out, indiscriminate spraying of pesticides, and unsafe drinking water. This concern led to the formation of the most powerful environmental regulatory agency in the world, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), an organization whose scientists and engineers and sociologists and economists have been tasked to figure out policies to save “Spaceship Earth”. Today, the formidable knowledge and power represented by the USEPA are under threat of being destroyed and the very strategies that have helped to make the North American environment the envy of the world are in grave danger of being dismantled. In understanding the historical underpinnings, we can attempt to move forward with sustainable solutions.

Keynote Lecture

10:00 AM - 10:45 AM | Session Chair: Dr. Mehrab Mehrvar, Ryerson University, Canada

Catalytic Strategies for the Production of Renewable Fuels and Chemicals
Dr. Ya-Huei Chin, University of Toronto, Canada


Abstract
Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive renewable feedstock for synthesizing next generation fuels and chemicals. There are significant challenges in processing this feedstock, because of its structural complexities and high oxygen contents. I will review the various catalytic strategies in processing this feedstock, describe the challenges in this area, and discuss the recent advancement. Specifically, the chemical technology requires selective removal of oxygen heteroatoms with hydrogen, through catalytic pathway turning. This is achieved by coupling of chemistry and transport events at the various length scales, designing catalytically active sites that promote the cascade reactions, and effectively activating and transporting the hydrogen. I will describe the technology for processing the pyrolysis derived oxygenates to hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals and for converting phenolic compounds derived from lignin to higher value products. Emphasizing within this talk is about the design of catalyst structures and their specific catalytic functions in activating the oxygenates and hydrogen. This fundamental understanding of catalytic chemistry, when couples with reactor design and optimization, allows us to advance the atomic and energy efficiencies of the processes.

Session

10:45 AM- 11:15 AM I The Poster Session will be taking place in the hall next to room ENG-LG-015

Poster Session
Session Chair: Dr. Nozar Samani, Shiraz University, Iran


Authors
Sun-Gyu Park, Sun-A Kim
Authors
Jeong, Gyo-Cheol, Choo, Chang-Oh, Ryu, Jeong-Ok, Cho, Heuy-Nam
Authors
Jeong Hwan Kim, Seung-Hun Lee, Sang-Hoon Jo, Seungmin Hyun, Kwanoh Kim, Doo-Sun Choi, Jae Sung Yoon, Yeong-Eun Yoo
Authors
Jae Sung Yoon, Nguyen Thi Phuong, Jeong Hwan Kim, Kwanoh Kim, Doo-Sun Choi, Seungmin Hyun, Yeong-Eun Yoo
Authors
Jeonggwan Kim

Session

11:15 AM - 11:55 AM

Greenhouse Effect and Environmental Sustainability
Session Chair: Dr. Lynda H. McCarthy, Ryerson University, Canada


Time
11:15 - 11:35
Authors
Naim Haie
Abstract
Water use systems (WUSs), such as, urban areas and irrigated agriculture, are under increasing pressure due to various uncertain drivers, such as, global warming and population increase. Because of these phenomena, water scarcity and pollution are increasing causing severe economic, environmental and social damages. Consequently, water management and design (WMD) must focus on comprehensive performance of WUSs by integrating three pillars: water quantity, quality and benefits. These are the foundations of a new framework called Sefficiency, which incorporates the three dimensions of sustainability: environmental, economic and social. Sefficiency indicators have three levels Macro, Meso and Micro (3ME, in %), which make the trade-offs between pillars, dimensions and levels transparent. The crucial distinction between water use and water consumption produces both IN / OUT Sefficiency indicators, crucial for comprehensive and systemic analyses. The logical proof of Sefficiency is objective based on the water balance principle for any WUS under analysis. This universal law guarantees the robustness of the results of 3ME by defining nine Water Flow path Types (WFT). The fact that they are fixed and hydrologically unambiguous promotes a powerful and explicit enabler for active and effective involvement of various types of stakeholders. Usefulness Criterion for each WFT and/or Water Flow Paths is the multiplicative impact of both water quality and beneficial weights. Hence, Sefficiency is the ratio of useful outflow to its corresponding total useful flow, which can reveal the complexities and non-linearities in WMD. For this paper, after presenting a summary of Sefficiency, a simple agricultural example is explained, showing some of the possibilities of Sefficiency. For example, the use of technology as a positive change agent may, under some circumstances, prove to be harmful. This is particularly so if the system has more than one objective, such as, food production and groundwater recharge or pollution control.
Keywords
Sustainable efficiency, Sefficiency; water management; trade-off; water balance; pollution; benefits; water use and water consumption; Multi-level water reallocation
Time
11:35 - 11:55
Authors
Nozar Samani, Zahra Jamshidi
Abstract
In recent years, Fars Province in southern Iran has suffered from drought and faced with serious challenges in the water sector, including but not limited to rising water demand and shortage, declining groundwater levels, deteriorating water quality, and increasing ecosystem losses. Climate change is blamed for water crisis. To investigate the trend of climate change and its effect on water crisis, the change-point years in temperature, precipitation and groundwater level time series in Fars Province, Iran were determined for the period 1974-2014 (40 years) and compared with the change year in groundwater level, river discharge and the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) data. In 12 stations distributed in the province, annual, half-yearly, seasonal and monthly time series were analyzed. The Pettitt-Mann-Whitney, Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon and Cumulative Sum tests were applied to determine the significance of the detected changes. The result indicates that 1998 and 1995 are the most probable change-point years in the time series of precipitation and temperature, respectively. Compared to the period before 1998 and 1995, annual precipitation and temperature over the province have decreased and increased, respectively. Seasonal precipitation amounts have generally decreased during Autumn, Winter and Spring. In consistence with this finding, the change-point year in SOI time series was found to be the year 1998 that indicates the possible forcing effects of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon on the Fars Province climate. Most probably, La Nina phenomenon reduced precipitation in Fars province. However, changes detected in the time series of groundwater level are not consistence with those of climate parameters. It seems that inefficient agriculture sector, mismanagement, over-extraction and thirst for development are main causes for water crisis and the climate change has triggered the crisis.
Keywords
Climate change, change-point, Mann-Whitney-Pettitt test, SOI, La Nina

Keynote Lecture

1:00 PM - 1:45 PM | Session Chair: Dr. Y-H. Chin, University of Toronto, Canada

Innovation in a Regulated Environment: Why Do We Need it and How Are We Going to Get It?
Tom Kaszas, Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change, Canada


Abstract
Today’s environmental engineering challenges have moved beyond the traditional. Traditional environmental engineering approaches were by a large developed to address eutrophication and aesthetic concerns, and focussed on point source discharges and macro contaminants such as pathogenic bacteria (coliforms), oxygen depleting organic matter and nutrients. Today’s environmental challenges are more complex and include contaminants of emerging concern (some of which are the products of our conventional treatment approaches). Increasing densification of urban centres provides both challenges and opportunities for distributed treatment infrastructure, stormwater management and water reuse. How can we stimulate the innovation we need to solve these complex challenges and seize these opportunities within a regulatory framework that was designed with the conventional in mind?

Workshop

2:05 PM - 4:05 PM

Combined Photochemical and Biological Processes for Water and Wastewater Treatment: an Overview of Trends, Advances, and Future
Dr. Mehrab Mehrvar, Ryerson University


Abstract
One of the greatest challenges of water and wastewater treatment technologies is the use of combined processes to achieve the most advantages of each process alone. The choice of the process and/or integration of the processes depend strongly on the wastewater characteristics, concentrations, and the desired efficiencies. It has been observed that the coupling of a biological reactor with advanced oxidation technologies (AOTs) could reduce the final concentrations of the effluent to the desired values. Advanced oxidation technologies are mainly based on the production of highly potent hydroxyl radicals which attack organic compounds and produce carbon dioxide and water. However, optimizing the total cost of the treatment is a challenge, as AOTs are much more expensive than the biological processes alone. Therefore, an appropriate design should not only consider the ability of this coupling to reduce the concentrations of organic pollutants, but also try to obtain the desired results in a cost effective process. To consider the total cost of the treatment, the residence time in biological and photochemical reactors, the kinetic rates, and the capital and operating costs of the reactors play significant roles. In most case studies, it has been shown that the integration processes were more efficient than individual processes. However, slight changes in the configuration of the reactors, temperature, pH, treatment time, concentration of oxidants, and microorganism colonies could lead to a great deviation in results. Hence, in some cases, the coupling of these processes lowered the total efficiency of the system. It is important to consider the possibility of coupling different processes in lowering the total cost of the system while maximizing the rate of total degradation of organic pollutants. In this workshop, recent developments and trends on the integration of photochemical and biological processes for the degradation of organic pollutants in water and wastewater will be discussed. Case studies for the treatment of selected organic compounds will be addressed.

Friday
August 25


Room ENG-LG-021
9:00 AM - 9:45 AM
Keynote Lecture

Examples of Recent Development and Application of Environmental Modeling and Assessment
Dr. Zhi Chen, Concordia University, Canada

9:45 AM - 10:30 AM
Keynote Lecture

Novel Applications for Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) for Municipal and Industrial Wastewater Treatment Technologies
Dr. Ahmed ElDyasti, York University, Canada

10:30 AM - 10:50 AM
Coffee Break
10:50 AM - 12:10 AM
Session

Water & Wastewater Pollution and Treatment

12:10 PM - 1:10 PM
Lunch
1:10 PM - 2:00 PM
Session

Air Pollution and Treatment

2:00 PM - 2:40 PM
Session

Green Manufacturing and Technologies, Pollution Prevention

Keynote Lecture

9:00 AM - 9:45 AM | Session Chair: Dr. Mehrab Mehrvar, Ryerson University

Examples of Recent Development and Application of Environmental Modeling and Assessment
Dr. Zhi Chen, Concordia University, Canada


Abstract
There have been many new developments in environmental models and their field applications in the new century. New modeling tools have significantly supported the assessment and control of a variety of site contaminations worldwide. This talk presents a few such examples in relation to air, water, and soil medium. First it will brief a surface water example in which a new coupled near- and far- field three-dimensional numerical dispersion model is developed, validated, and applied to the offshore area in the Eastern Canada. Second, a satellite-aided large scale air quality model is introduced where mixed emission sources are considered and the developed modeling tool is systematically supported and validated by satellite monitoring data with field applications in the North America and Asia. Third, new efforts are observed to extend the wellapplied Multimedia Fate and Transport Modeling methods, such attempts include the numerical consideration of spatial and temporal resolution as well as field applications at both small and large scales. Recent environmental models have also been linked to new risk assessment and uncertainty analysis methods to deliver robust sustainability-related decision-making support.

Keynote Lecture

9:45 AM - 10:30 AM | Session Chair: Dr. Mehrab Mehrvar, Ryerson University

Novel Applications for Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) for Municipal and Industrial Wastewater Treatment Technologies
Dr. Ahmed ElDyasti, York University, CAnada


Abstract
Billion of dollars are spent annually for operating and maintenance costs to reduce the greenhouse gases for waste and wastewater treatment plants in Canada, while current society demands for clean and safe environment have been increasing. In parallel, energy security and climate change mainly caused by anthropogenic activities have become a national and international issue to be addressed. In 2016, waste management sector has contributed by 3.4% of Canada’s total GHG emissions. On the other hand, waste treatment plants (WTPs) are considered extensively energy demanding facilities, for instance, sewage treatment facilities only have consumed more than 22% of the total electrical demand of Toronto city facilities in 2016. Thus, it is pivotal to develop sustainable technologies not only for waste treatment or mitigation of the resulted GHG, but also for value-added resources and energy recovery from different waste streams.
Anaerobic digestion process has been widely adopted by WTPs for waste minimization and biogas production. Nevertheless, multiple obstacles limit the direct use of the produced biogas such as the presence of impurities and its low handling and collecting capabilities. Those obstacles drive most of the sewage treatment facilities to flare the produced biogas. In the city of Toronto only, 90,000m3 biogas/day is produced from wastewater treatment facilities, which indicates how large and vital is the biogas either as a pollutant or an energy resource.
Research on new Gas mitigation technologies for upgrading municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants and the treatment of internal side streams without the need for expansion of the existing volumes is therefore essential. Furthermore, the emerging trend of reducing power consumption and carbon footprint for wastewater treatment plant is driving technology development. The new generation of such treatment processes will include the application of sustainable novel biological shortcut nutrient removal reactors coupled with the recovery of the value-added products and energy that are generated in such a process, as well as the use of energy-efficient processes to transform “energyconsuming treatment processes” into “energy-saving and energy–positive systems”. The primary focus of this talk is to provide a high-level overview of the next generation of wastewater treatment plants using biofilm processes and their integration to maximize energy and value-added products recovery, including biomethane, biohydrogen, and biopower, in accordance with the emerging paradigm shift towards mining resources from wastewater.

Session

10:50 AM- 12:10 PM

Water & Wastewater Pollution and Treatment
Session Chair: Dr. Ahmed ElDyasti, York University, CAnada


Time
10:50 - 11:10
Authors
Anton Purnama, Huda Ali Al Maamari, Promise Mebine
Abstract
Using an analytical solution of a two-dimensional advection-diffusion equation with a point source on a simple model of seabed depth profile change, the effect of erosion on a sloping seabed upon mixing and dispersion of the outfall effluent discharges in coastal waters is investigated. For near-shore discharges, the maximum value of concentration at the shore is formulated and used as an environmental impact measure that should not be exceeded anywhere along the shoreline. It is found that, the bed erosion increases this maximum value, and installing a multiport diffuser at the end of the outfall long pipeline can supress this increase.
Keywords
Advection-diffusion equation, far field model, multiport diffuser, near-shore, sea outfall, shoreline concentration, sloping seabed
Time
11:20 - 11:40
Authors
Abdelsalam Elawwad, Mohamed Abo-Zaid, Minerva Edward
Abstract
Modeling of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) has proven itself as a very useful tool for understanding and optimizing wastewater processes. A validated model can be quite beneficial in terms of cost saving due to the prediction of the outcome of various operation scenarios and choosing the optimum operation strategy. In this paper, BioWin model (Envirosim, Canada) was used to describe the performance of an Egyptian wastewater treatment plant located in Cairo, Egypt. Gabal El-Asfar WWTP is a mega WWTP, the largest in Africa and the Middle East, and receiving municipal wastewater. Applying the Good Modeling Practice (GMP) protocol showed clear organized steps for successful modeling of Gabal El-Asfar WWTP. Historical data and design reports have been collected and various site visits have been made besides a detailed sampling campaign to perform a proper wastewater characterization and a successful model calibration. The model calibration was performed under steady-state conditions by adjusting seven stoichiometric and kinetic parameters: heterotrophic maximum growth rate, heterotrophic aerobic decay rate, substrate half saturation, maximum AOB growth rate, AOB decay rate, NH4 substrate half saturation, and finally maximum NOB growth rate. The model was calibrated and validated using BioWin v.5.2 software. The BioWin model was successfully used for creating a plant-wide model for Gabal El-Asfar WWTP with accuracy high enough to perform plant optimization in further studies.
Keywords
Biological treatment, BioWin, mathematical modeling, wastewater, plant-wide simulation.
Time
11:40 - 11:50
Authors
Gülten Yüksek, Lounes Haroune, Didem Okutman Taş, Hubert Cabana
Time
11:50 - 12:00
Authors
Gülten Yüksek, Lounes Haroune, Didem Okutman Taş, Hubert Cabana
Time
12:00 - 12:10
Authors
Qiming Xian, Haifeng Chen, Mei Li, Tingting Gong

Session

1:10 PM - 2:00 PM

Air Pollution and Treatment
Session Chair: Dr. Hiroyuki Kagami, Fujita Health University, Japan


Time
1:10 - 1:30
Authors
Ewa M. Cukrowska, Bongani N. Yalala, Hlanganani Tutu, Luke Chimuka
Abstract
Mercury concentrations (HgTOT) were analysed in total and size fractions in urban dust. The results showed that HgTOT ranged from 270 to 1350 µg kg-1 for PM25 particle size fraction. The distribution was as follows: HgIndustrial > HgCBD > HgResidential. The HgTOT showed a positive correlation with percent volume of the PM25 size fraction. This indicated that as the particles size decreased, the HgTOT increased. The dust was mainly characterized by high concentration levels of quartz (74.3 to 97.6 wt. %). The tailings dumps showed similar levels of quartz (65 to 81 wt. %), which indicated that tailings are the major anthropogenic sources of mercury in the dust. Both, the tailings dumps and the dust samples showed well defined crystalline structures of the quartz coated with trace elements.
Keywords
Mercury, Particulate Matter, Dust, Tailings dumps
Time
1:30 - 1:50
Authors
Raúl Guerrero Torres
Abstract
The main goal of this paper is to report emission tests results achieved with the Power Pack™, an Increasing Oxygen device for enhancing fuel efficiency of internal combustion engines in mobile sources, fabricated in U.S.A by H&G Fluid Stabilization Technology and evaluated in Colombia under the sponsorship of DEL LTDA. The Power Pack™ is installed properly on the fuel supply line. When the fuel flows through its internal parts where it exposes to two neodymium magnets, negative charges are transferred through a grounded wire and becomes positively charged. Then, when the fuel mixes with the air, near complete combustion is obtained. Five cars and five motorcycles were tested without and with the device installed to analyse emissions variations. Two types of tests were made: Single Day Tests; two tests, for all the vehicles, with and without the device installed, and Periodical Tests; with the device installed, for chosen vehicles, in different days, to check emissions variations over time. Carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons emissions results were obtained from gas analysers of two Automotive Diagnostic Centers in the city of Cartagena, Colombia. When results of Single Day Tests for cars were analysed, remarkable average emissions reductions of 75% in HC and 71.73% in CO were obtained. For motorcycles, remarkable average emissions reductions of 74.32% in HC and 75.38% in CO were obtained. From Periodical Tests results for the studied car, final emissions reductions of 57.30% in HC and 27.71% in CO were obtained. For the first studied motorcycle final emissions reductions of 28.65% in HC and 41.53% in CO were obtained. For the second studied motorcycle final emissions reductions of 72 % in HC and 15.92% in CO were obtained. All the vehicles fulfilled the Colombian norms after having the PP™ installed.
Keywords
ADC, IC engines, Mobile Sources emissions, Fuel Efficiency optimizer
Time
1:50 - 2:00
Authors
Jingya Sun, Yuxiang Han, Haiqin Wan, Shourong Zheng, Lin Dong

Session

2:00 PM- 2:40 PM

Green Manufacturing and Technologies, Pollution Prevention
Session Chair: Dr. Ewa Cukrowska, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa


Time
2:00 - 2:10
Authors
Farhad Amirifard, Fuzhan Nasiri
Time
2:10 - 2:20
Authors
Mariola Kądziołka-Gaweł, Marzena Rachwał
Time
2:20 - 2:40
Authors
Raymond Oriebe Anyasi, Harrison Ifeanyichukwu Atagana
Abstract
The study is aimed at identifying native plants growing around petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated site in Umuahia, Nigeria that has the ability to phytoremediate the contaminant from the soil. A total of 28 native plants in the area were sampled. Most of the plants demonstrated the ability to grow in a high concentration of the total petroleum hydrocarbon which is an indication that they can be used for phytoremediation of a petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil. Chromolaena odorata, Aspilla africana, Chloris babata, Pasparlum vaginatum, Bryophylum pinnatum, Paspalum scrobiculatum, Spondias mombim, Euragrostis atrovilens, Cyperus rotundus, Uvaria chamae all demonstrated phytoremediation characteristics in the contaminated site. Among those characteristics was the ability to survive the toxic nature of the contamination and to uptake part of the contamination. Pearson correlation demonstrated a significant and positive relations (r = 0.64, p = 0.003) (p ˂ 0.05) between the soil and root TPH. Using bioaccumulation factor as a module for phytoremediation resulted in Linear regression between TPH concentration in the soil and root tissue of Y = 1.8696x + 608.55. From this study, chromolaena odorata, Aspilla Africana and Uvaria chamae were selected as candidate plants for phytoremediation of PAHs.
Keywords
Native plants, contaminated sites, PAHs, TPHs, Phytoremediation, Organic compounds